MYTH: The Last 10 Pounds Are Impossible to Lose

The last few pounds are always the hardest to lose – but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible to do! Use the following tips to clean up your diet and drop those final few pounds.

The Truth: The body struggles to hold on to that last bit of fat for survival purposes, so while it is tough to lose the last five to 10 pounds, it’s definitely doable.

You know what I like to call those last 10 or 15 pounds that won’t come off no matter what you do? Vanity pounds. The term describes our desire to lose weight that, as far as our bodies are concerned, actually feels healthy. Personally, I have gained and lost the same eight vanity pounds more times than I care to admit. Losing your first 50 pounds might have been tough, but believe me, dropping those final few stubborn pounds is a whole different challenge. Here are a few rules to follow:

Completely cut out processed foods. The best way to lose weight — even those last 10 pounds — is by eating CLEAN. This means absolutely NO processed foods! While you may have been watching what you were eating before, now is the time to truly crack down. Processed food is anything that has been altered from its natural state, such as fruit that has been canned to make it last longer or refined grains. Try to restrict yourself to eat only fresh organic fruits, vegetables, lean meats, and dairy, as well as whole grains. Check the labels on all of the food you buy. If you see ingredients that are questionable — don’t buy it! If you can’t pronounce something on the ingredient list — leave it on the shelf.

Cut your sodium intake and drink more water. Just because you’re not reaching for the salt shaker at every meal doesn’t mean you’re watching your sodium intake! Salt is in nearly every food — some of the worst culprits are breads, cold cuts/cured meats, sandwiches, pizza, poultry and soup. To commit to dropping your vanity pounds, you should keep a close eye on your sodium intake and cut it down to 1,000 mg per day. Once you start looking at food labels, you may realize this is harder than you thought, but it’s possible — trust me. Also, up your water intake. Eighty ounces is equal to 10 cups of water and I would like that to be your goal each day. It won’t be hard to hit if you’re working out!

Abstain from alcohol. Booze can sabotage your weight-loss efforts. It releases estrogen into your bloodstream, promotes fat storage, and decreases muscle growth. It makes you hungry and loosens your inhibitions — so you’re more likely to give into temptations, like unhealthy food. Plus, alcoholic beverages contain more calories than most people think. If you’re serious about losing this weight, it’s best to avoid alcohol until you’re in maintenance mode.

Train at 85 percent of your maximum heart rate for 1 hour, 5 times a week. You have to exercise to lose weight — and to lose those last 10 pounds, you’ll need to push yourself. Up the intensity of your workouts and make sure you’re fitting them in at least five times a week.

The Bottom Line: You can do this! The last 10 pounds will come off, you just need to be a bit more strict with your diet. Avoid all alcohol and processed food, watch your sodium intake, drink more water, and exercise five times a week and watch those stubborn vanity pounds finally melt away.

Credit to http://www.jillianmichaels.com/fit/lose-weight/myth-vanity-pounds?xid=nl_LosingItWithJillianMichaels_20150223

MYTH: Weighing Yourself Daily Will Help You Stay on Track

Stepping on the scale doesn’t have to be a scary event for yearly doctor’s visits – and it also doesn’t have to be a daily torture ritual. There is a happy medium in there – I’ll help you find it.

The Truth: I recommend that people weigh themselves once a week, at the same time every week. Weighing yourself every day can have a negative impact on you.

For so many of us the scale is a source of stress and self-loathing, but it really shouldn’t be. Don’t think of the scale as anything other than a compass — something we use when losing weight to keep us going in the right direction. It tells us what’s going on with our bodies so we can effectively modify our regimen to ensure continued weight loss. It’s just a tool — no more and no less. So how frequently should you consult it? Here’s my opinion on the topic:

Your weight varies throughout the day. Not only does your weight change every day, it also changes at different times through a single day, so there is no point to weighing yourself every day — and definitely not multiple times a day.This is because of body fluid fluctuations –— you might be retaining water from too much sodium consumption, or you may not have gone to the bathroom yet (gross, but true). All of these things affect your weight. The issue with checking the scale DAILY, is that minor fluctuations can freak people out — or discourage them from their weight-loss efforts. Instead, take photos , body measurements, and judge yourself by your fitness endurance and how your clothes are fitting you.

To use the scale effectively, you should weigh yourself once a week. I want you to weigh yourself once a week at the same time, on the same day of the week, wearing similar clothing, and most importantly, ON THE SAME SCALE.  Weighing yourself just once a week will give you a more accurate read — you’ll allow time for the scale to actually show weight loss. The number on the scale will help you figure out if you need to make adjustments to what you’re eating or how you’re exercising. Keep in mind that half a pound to two pounds is a realistic weight loss so don’t expect results like the Biggest Loser contestants.

NEVER weighing yourself is a bad idea. Are you one of those people who doesn’t weigh themselves all year, and then finally steps on the scale at their annual physical? This isn’t the right way to go either! Never weighing yourself and, instead, determining how “healthy” you are by how you feel, isn’t the best method. To know how healthy you are is to know that number on the scale. If you’re in maintenance mode (and not trying lose weight), I’d still suggest you weigh yourself once a week, or at least twice a week. Your weight is a total picture of your overall health, and it’s good to keep tabs on yourself.

The Bottom Line: Confront the scale and find the right day for your weekly weigh in’s and stick with it so it turns into a habit.